sinaxi:

varrics:

sinaxi:

varrics:

sinaxi:

LEAVE!!! varrics GET OUT RIGHT NOW!!!

#thinkin bout the time he literally turned himself back into the winter soldier bc nat was gone   #i mean fuck widow hunt but also thanks for that 

WILLINGLY BRAINWASHED HIMSELF BACK INTO A WEAPON TO TRY AND KILL HER EXBOYFRIEND

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who are u kidding he doesn’t love natasha at all plz check urself it’s not like he didn’t willingly become a human weapon again in pursuit of finding her (his worst fear and something he’d been trying to repent for /for years/ lmao)

its not like she was the catalyst for his original programming starting to break its not like she ‘was the only good thing in all of it’ its not like he stops in the middle of fights to think about how much he loves her nah

nAH

please understand they have nothing in the mcu it will never happen despite the fact that their characters still parallel each other to extreme degrees what with nat and bucky’s arcs in cap 2 being very similar given she ends the film with a crisis of identity and realizes she doesn’t really know who /she/ is yet, and bucky ends the film with an even bigger crisis of identity as he tries to figure out how to reconcile who he’s been as the winter soldier for the past seventy years with who he once was as bucky barnes.

please understand nat couldn’t possibly understand what he went through given it’s not like her mcu counterpart hints to having undergone brainwashing and having her entire mind unmade. NAH. SURELY SHE WOULDN’T BE THE MOST QUALIFIED TO UNDERSTAND BUCKY’S SITUATION.

#I CAN ADD NOTHING TO THIS #the gospel truth #no one in the mcu can understand what bucky will/has been through except natasha #’do you know what its like to be unmade’ ‘you know that i do’ #HMMM WHAT IS THAT HINT AT BRAINWASHING/FAULTY MEMORIES #huffs about false memories huffs about natasha not being able to tell whats true and whats false anymore #HUFFS ABOUT NATASHA AND BUCKY ENDING THIS MOVIE ON THE SAME NOTE: SELF DISCOVERY #who are you without your web to hide in; who are you without your programming #who are you if you are no longer an agent; who are you if you are no longer a weapon (via)

because i’m hungry and hollow and just want something to call my own.

(Source: eposetties, via varrics)

candyumbrella:

Reign and Women Part 6 - A show that genuinely likes women
This is the 6th of a series of posts about why I love the way Reign writes stories about and for women.
This show just likes women. It genuinely likes and understands women. This is a rare, RARE thing, and it makes such a difference when watching. A lot of shows only “like” women when they meet some pre-set standards for ~strength or ~worth (however those are defined), and dismiss anything else as silly or shallow or whatever. And some shows are interested in women, but the narrative just comes with so much self-loathing baggage that it gets exhausting to watch (I mean, self-loathing baggage is the engine that drives a lot of storytelling, and sometimes that storytelling can be great. It’s just nice to have a show without it for once.) Reign not only likes women, it’s happy and comfortable doing so. This is GREAT—it guarantees clarity of framing almost by default, prevents false sentiment, and lends an instinctive understanding to the narrative with respect to its main themes.One way in which this shows up onscreen: I’ve never really seen a show before that so explicitly dissects the mechanisms of Might Makes Right and how that is linked to the judgment of morality for women. There’s a scene in 1x12 where the Medicis disown Catherine after she’s been found guilty of adultery, and she says indignantly that they can’t do this to her, it’s unfair, think of all the people in their family who’ve taken lovers! And her relatives tell her that she hasn’t let them down by taking a lover, she’s let them down by LOSING, and so they can’t back her up anymore. This is something I’ve seen implicitly in the narratives of so many shows—this complicated entanglement of how Winning Equates To Righteousness and vice versa, which is something that holds across the board in society but is particularly extreme for women. Women are so often ostensibly condemned or acquitted on ~moral grounds, but if you look at the actual facts of the situation, most of the time the factor that truly determines how they’re judged, is the extent to which they’re a winner or loser in the game of social politics. A winner can get away with murder (sometimes literally); a loser will be denigrated for doing something that’s not nearly as bad, or even if she hasn’t actually done anything wrong. And this effect is multiplied a thousandfold because a woman’s sexuality is implicitly associated with her morality.
Reign possesses the unusual quality of genuinely, unabashedly loving and sympathizing with women—all women, not just women who meet some set of predefined standards—to such a degree that it can analyze and portray this social phenomenon without agreeing with it, thus allowing it to bring these concepts into the open in a scene like the one above. It’s such a subtle point to get across and it’s the first time I’ve seen it done so well—and Reign does this all the time, just as an inherent part of its storytelling, in many different ways.

candyumbrella:

Reign and Women
Part 6 - A show that genuinely likes women

This is the 6th of a series of posts about why I love the way Reign writes stories about and for women.

This show just likes women. It genuinely likes and understands women. This is a rare, RARE thing, and it makes such a difference when watching. A lot of shows only “like” women when they meet some pre-set standards for ~strength or ~worth (however those are defined), and dismiss anything else as silly or shallow or whatever. And some shows are interested in women, but the narrative just comes with so much self-loathing baggage that it gets exhausting to watch (I mean, self-loathing baggage is the engine that drives a lot of storytelling, and sometimes that storytelling can be great. It’s just nice to have a show without it for once.) Reign not only likes women, it’s happy and comfortable doing so. This is GREAT—it guarantees clarity of framing almost by default, prevents false sentiment, and lends an instinctive understanding to the narrative with respect to its main themes.

One way in which this shows up onscreen: I’ve never really seen a show before that so explicitly dissects the mechanisms of Might Makes Right and how that is linked to the judgment of morality for women. There’s a scene in 1x12 where the Medicis disown Catherine after she’s been found guilty of adultery, and she says indignantly that they can’t do this to her, it’s unfair, think of all the people in their family who’ve taken lovers! And her relatives tell her that she hasn’t let them down by taking a lover, she’s let them down by LOSING, and so they can’t back her up anymore. This is something I’ve seen implicitly in the narratives of so many shows—this complicated entanglement of how Winning Equates To Righteousness and vice versa, which is something that holds across the board in society but is particularly extreme for women. Women are so often ostensibly condemned or acquitted on ~moral grounds, but if you look at the actual facts of the situation, most of the time the factor that truly determines how they’re judged, is the extent to which they’re a winner or loser in the game of social politics. A winner can get away with murder (sometimes literally); a loser will be denigrated for doing something that’s not nearly as bad, or even if she hasn’t actually done anything wrong. And this effect is multiplied a thousandfold because a woman’s sexuality is implicitly associated with her morality.

Reign possesses the unusual quality of genuinely, unabashedly loving and sympathizing with women—all women, not just women who meet some set of predefined standards—to such a degree that it can analyze and portray this social phenomenon without agreeing with it, thus allowing it to bring these concepts into the open in a scene like the one above. It’s such a subtle point to get across and it’s the first time I’ve seen it done so well—and Reign does this all the time, just as an inherent part of its storytelling, in many different ways.

inwhichiamasupervillain:

Let’s remember that Bucky Barnes without Steve Rogers was the kid who befriended a small sickly boy looked down on and picked on by everyone else without caring what anyone thought.

Bucky Barnes without Steve Rogers was a smart, bright, likable young man who enjoyed going to dance halls and science fairs.

Bucky Barnes without Steve Rogers earned the respect, friendship, and loyalty of his soldiers to such an extent that when a stranger in spangly tights saves their lives only to ask them to follow him back into the fray, they agree because this guy’s nuts but he’s got Sarge’s seal of approval.

Bucky Barnes without Steve Rogers withstood years of unimaginable physical and psychological torture until his captors were finally forced to strip him of his memories and all sense of self in order to make him compliant, and even then had to phrase his missions as fights for the good of the world.

And then, Bucky Barnes, with no knowledge of Steve Rogers or himself, with no agency or moral compass, couldn’t be kept out of cryostasis for too long lest he regain the smallest sense of self and turn on his masters. Because even they knew that James Buchanan Barnes was the furthest thing from a bully, and feared the vengeance he would bring down on them if he realized what they were forcing him to do.

And this is just Bucky Barnes in the MCU, who’s had maybe a half hour of screen time and a handful of lines.

Yeah, the seeds of the Winter Soldier are in Bucky, insomuch as he is competent, loyal, fierce, a brilliant tactician, capable of doing the dirty work to save others the burden, and a bit ruthless when it comes to protecting innocents and those he loves. But isn’t it telling that even stripped of everything but these attributes and then turned to destruction and chaos he becomes, not a bully, but an asset of terrifying efficiency? The Winter Soldier is single-minded and brutal in carrying out his missions, but he is an effective soldier, not a bully.

James Buchanan Barnes is a hero, and nothing, not the absence of one man (even a man like Steve Rogers) or anything else, could change that.

(via genderqueerbarnes)